Investing in Young Creatives

Each year, the American Advertising Federation of Nashville puts on the Student ADDY Awards, honoring some of our city’s most talented and promising young creatives. Naturally, we are allll over that.

We support these students in two ways:

1. Sponsoring awards at the Student ADDYs.

This year’s entries were awesome. We are so glad we didn’t have to judge and just got to watch them get cool trophies. This year’s winners:

Best of Show – $500 scholarship and crystal trophy

Austin Reasonver
Muji Ad Campaign
Magazine Campaign
Nossi College of Art

Muji 3

Judge’s Favorites – Crystal trophy

Grace Pavlic
Beast
Illustration
Watkins College of Art, Design & Film

beastlowres

 

Chris Fornal
The Birds of Astrobrights
Packaging
Watkins College of Art, Design & Film

20170218_135946 1

 

Matthew Eason
Hop Tamale’s
Integrated Brand Identity Campaign
Middle Tennessee State University

Hop Tamale 2

 

Jake Kennedy
Lumen, the Lights Out Buddy
Packaging
Watkins College of Art, Design & Film

Lumen

 

Rising Star – $500 scholarship

Grace Pavlic
Watkins College of Art, Design & Film

32243470223_dfdcb8aea3_o

 

We liked these guys so much that we invited them to sit with us at the big kid ADDY Awards the following Saturday. It was pretty great.

See full list of winners.

 

2. Mentorship through our internship program.

When it comes to creativity, there’s only so much you can learn in a classroom. We give them real-world experience, creative freedom, and guidance that pushes them to see creativity in new ways. We also haven’t made anyone cry yet, so we’re doing pretty well.

Are you a creative student? Do you know a creative student? Do you know someone who looks young enough to be a creative student? Send them our way. We’re always looking for stellar interns to join the team.

Apply now!

 

Hutzel really loves getting his picture taken.

Hutzel-AAF

Live from Nashville, it’s Saturday Night!

When we were recruited to help out with the ADDYs, our first question was “do we get extra drink tickets?” … then we realized we’d just been invited to throw one of our favorite Nashville parties of the year, so we signed on the dotted line. 

At first, we tossed out the usual party theme ideas:

  • Enchanted Kingdom
  • Under the Sea
  • Casino Night
  • Joe’s 8th Birthday Party
  • The Avengers

Then we started to move past the high school prom vibe
and flexed those creative muscles a bit:

  • Laser Tag
  • Rave
  • Giant Game of Twister
  • Carnival where every tent is just a dunk tank with an
    ADDY-nominated CEO in the drop seat.

Then we spotted a tiny plastic hand that had fallen into a dusty corner, and we just knew just the prescription for our fever.

And so was born the 2017 ADDY Awards

 

AAFN_AAA-2017_FB-Promo-Deadline1

 

We spent the next several weeks watching Matt Foley’s motivational speeches and brushing up on our ape tit trivia. We got the shipment of cowbells and Spartan pom poms, so we’re just about set.

Hope you’ll join us for a night to remember.
Check it out.

WE ARE SO FREAKIN’ EXCITED

so-freakin-excited

6 Ways To Protect Company Culture

by Mary Timaeus

“Culture” is a bit of a buzzword for organizations right now, particularly for creative agencies. Leaders and HR managers throw the word around a lot, but based on the experiences the FoxFuel friends and members have had in other companies, most are missing the mark.

FOXF_Culture_Blog-Art

We’ve found that when talking about company culture, organizations focus on the perks – free coffee, afternoon cornhole games, people in furry mascot costumes passing out beer – and those things are great, in fact, we have most of them at FoxFuel (still working on the fox costume). But those aren’t the things that establish good culture. All the perks in the world can’t make up for a petty coworker, a disrespectful boss, or a lazy team. Good culture is not rooted in perks, it’s rooted in values. Trust, respect, encouragement, etc. – these are the things that will make the difference for a team.

Now these can also turn to buzzwords pretty quickly, so we have a few practical ways to put them into action and facilitate strong culture in your company:

Do small stuff often.

Go to lunch together on Fridays or do a one minute plank at 4 p.m. every day. Doing small things together makes the big things like retreats and holiday parties more comfortable and genuine. Think of the small things as ice guards, keeping the vibes warm and cozy so icebreakers are never needed.

Stick with what you know.

Sometimes it’s fun to switch things up, like trading Friday lunch for a game of laser tag. But on the regular, it’s best to stick with what you know works. Is your office more into games and music? Don’t try to force them into kickball simply for the sake of shaking things up. Keep rolling with the good stuff till the appeal rubs off, then try something new.

Laser eyes at laser tag.

Laser eyes at laser tag.

Be inclusive.

Does someone have a dairy allergy? Have a few vegetarians around? Maybe there is Muslim on staff or several team members with families. A company picnic with burgers and pepperoni pizza at 6:30 p.m. on a Tuesday night during Ramadan probably isn’t the best way to bond. Sure, you might not be able to cater to everyone’s needs, but do your best to be considerate and as inclusive as possible.

Build traditions.

It’s the continuation of traditions that keep people together over years. Maybe you have some turnover, but the fact that you have a Thanksgiving meal together every year allows those who have moved on, those who are new, and those who have been there from the start to feel connected to each other and the foundation of the company.

Celebrate together.

We all have lives outside of work, but colleagues usually spend more time together than they spend with friends, roommates, significant others, etc. It’s important to bring life’s milestones into the workplace and take the time to celebrate together. Whether it’s a full baby shower or a simple grocery store cake, celebratory gestures let your coworkers know that you value them beyond their ability to get you that report on time.

FoxFuel baby shower.

FoxFuel baby shower.

Maintain healthy communication.

There’s nothing more disappointing than planning an amazing party just to have everyone walk around on eggshells or pair off into corners. The practice of healthy communication and feedback loops can prevent such instances and ensure that everyone feels comfortable to enjoy the party with each other.

Well, what are you waiting for? Go make your team not hate each other.

 

 


 

Lipscomb Is Hiring a Director of Digital Marketing

FoxFuel recently landed Lipscomb College of Business as a client, and as we do with all good clients, we help them find top talent to flesh out their marketing teams.  Apply through their site, and feel free to CC me, or let me know that you’ve applied (you must apply through their site), and I can put in a good word. Here’s a few excerpts from their job posting:

Lipscomb_Logo.svg

Primary Responsibility:

Responsible for the ongoing development and management of all digital assets used in marketing including, but not limited to, the university marketing website(s) as well as social media/networking sites. The candidate must also have proven ability to effectively collaborate with partners across the university to implement digital content and online marketing activities that are aligned with the university’s brand, values and goals.

Job Related Skills:

  • Commitment to the University and its mission, programs, and future aspirations
  • Strong, collaborative, energetic individual with a deep personal commitment to the highest standards of ethics, confidentiality and professionalism
  • Strong organizational skills and an appreciation and attention to detail
  • Ability to communicate effectively with University representatives, parents, students, alumni, donors and representatives of the business community
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills

A results-oriented individual who demonstrates the ability to work well with people at all levels of an organization, warmly develops relationships with diverse constituencies, and simultaneously employs keen judgment.

Experience: A minimum of five to seven years experience in digital marketing.

Hiring Statement:

Lipscomb University is a private, Christian university associated with the fellowship of the Church of Christ and governed by religious tenets held by the Church of Christ. Preference will be given to applicants who are members of the Church of Christ.

Check out the full job posting here: Director of Digital Marketing.

Good luck.

What 2015 Holds For Marketing

2015 is the year of collaboration. Marketing has gone digital for over a decade now and big brands are giving away the research, the tactics, and the means to buy media. Cheap and easy access means clients are demanding more of their agencies. To stay relevant, we have to adapt and collaborate.

Adapt: Depth Over Breadth

Ten years ago, agencies were clammering to beef up their shop, building multiple divisions under one roof. The result is an entity that is self-reliant, driven by agency profit, and is now falling short. We’ve seen a shift in client focus as they seek quality and innovation. More and more, decisions are based on what’s best for the work rather than what’s best for the bottom line.

A change in focus means a change in demand. Marketers hold more value in their ability to provide the best version of one thing than they would in providing the acceptable version of everything. What does that mean for marketers? Know what you’re good at, own it, and don’t be afraid to be transparent about the rest.

Collaborate: One Stop, Many Shops

Clients may only want the best, but they still want the best of everything. In Nashville, the call for quality has resulted in several different hyperfocused companies who are excellent at what they do. But while they’re providing the quality shop by shop, the separation requires extra effort from the client to juggle the various pieces for their brand.

There is an alternative to the circus act: collaboration.

If we–the creative agencies, tech companies, digital strategists, hyperfocused creators–can work together to combine forces and create truly innovative and pristine products, we can present our clients with perfectly packaged solutions that win for everyone.

FoxFuel and the Nashville Network

Here at FoxFuel, we have developed a habit (one that we’ll continue) of partnering with brilliant people in Nashville who have cornered the market in their area of expertise.

This habit has developed into a valuable skill set. Networking, brainstorming, and creating with other rising innovative talents in our city serves our clients better than building our own internal war chest of capabilities. While we never want to take credit for the genius behind the companies that we partner with, we do pride ourselves on the ability to meet and vet other passionate companies that can improve the ideas and concepts that we seek to deliver for clients.

We build relationships with these partners and maintain transparency with our clients. We won’t hide our collaborations; on the contrary, we want to make sure that our clients know we have the best of the best contributing to their brand.

We do all of this because the secret in the sauce for great marketing is literally the brain between our ears. This is greatness that fuels greatness in others, ignites innovation, and refuses to be extinguished.

To further demonstrate the growing relational culture of Nashville’s marketing world, we’ve invited a few great minds to speak to what they see for their industry in 2015. We didn’t ask for their secret to success or the 12 tips for content marketing; we asked them to speak to what they’re passionate about and its place in a changing industry.

 


Colton Mulligan is the Chief Executive Officer at FoxFuel Creative, where he drives strategy, partnerships and collaboration on behalf of their clients.